Evidence of the beneficiary’s authorship of scholarly articles in the field, in professional or major trade publications or other major media for EB-1A

What counts as Evidence of the beneficiary’s authorship of scholarly articles for EB-1A?

If the scholarly article has been cited or peer reviewed, then it can used. Evidence of the citation(s) and/or per review are required.

What does NOT count as Evidence of the beneficiary’s authorship of scholarly articles for EB-1A?

Incomplete Record of Scholarly Articles.

Articles that are not Scholarly.

Articles that have not been cited or peer reviewed.

Articles that are not published in Professional or Major Trade Publications or Other Major Media

What documentation do I submit to USCIS as Evidence of the beneficiary’s authorship of scholarly articles for EB-1A?

Results from scholarly literature search websites (such as SciFinder or Google Scholar) that show the beneficiary as the author, the title of the article, and the journal in which it was published; or

Paper copies of the beneficiary’s articles.

It is not necessary to submit full articles.

For each article, the petitioner only needs to submit the pages necessary to show:

The beneficiary as author;

The title of the article; and,

The journal in which it was published.

Documentary evidence that the beneficiary’s articles were written for and intended to be read by learned persons in a given field.

Documentary evidence to establish that the publications in which the articles appear are professional publications, trade publications, or other major media.

Such evidence could include circulation information.

If circulation information is submitted, it should be specific to the media format in which it was published. That is, if the article was published online, the evidence must relate to the website. If it was published in print, the evidence must relate to the printed publication.

Evidence of the citation(s) and/or peer review.